Royal Bermuda Yacht Club

How to make the
Royal Bermuda Yacht Club rum cocktail

Which dark rum is best for a Royal Bermuda Yacht Club?

The best dark rum to use when shaking up a Royal Bermuda Yacht Club is an aged Rum with a bit of Demerara character. Use Dos Maderas 5+3 with the classic recipe but if you want a slightly richer version, try using the Dos Maderas 5+5.

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About Dos Maderas 5+3 Rum

Dos Maderas 5+3 Rum blends the lighter Baja Rum with the richer Guyana style and ages for 5 years in the Caribbean followed by 3 years in Jerez, Spain in Palo Cortado casks. The smooth character of the 5+3 is awash with pleasant vanilla, hazelnut, coconut and subtle maple.

dos-maderas-5-3-bottle-cocktail-mobile

About Dos Maderas 5+3 Rum

Dos Maderas 5+3 Rum blends the lighter Baja Rum with the richer Guyana style and ages for 5 years in the Caribbean followed by 3 years in Jerez, Spain in Palo Cortado casks. The smooth character of the 5+3 is awash with pleasant vanilla, hazelnut, coconut and subtle maple. 

Ingredients to make a Royal Bermuda Yacht Club cocktail

2 oz. Dos Maderas 5+3

.5 oz. Falernum

.25 oz. Cointreau

.75 oz. Fresh lime juice

(optional) .25 oz. Simple Syrup (1:1) 

Royal Bermuda Yacht Club cocktail recipe

1.

Chill a Coupe

2.

Cut a lime in half and juice

3.

Add all ingredients to your shaker

4.

Fill shaker with cracked ice

5.

Shake for 10 seconds

5.

Double-strain, using a fine mesh strainer to remove excess pulp and ice shards, into your chilled glass

6.

Optional garnish: Carve the rind of a lime wedge with a criss cross pattern and add a couple peels as a sail garnish speared together with a cocktail pick

Origins of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club

If you’re wondering if there is such a thing as a Club Cocktail, then you should know the 19th and 20th centuries were full of organizations who had signature cocktails. From the Turf Club, to the Stork Club to the Jockey Club, the origins of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club cocktail seemingly have some kind of similar upbringing. And yet, the cocktail’s origins are not zeroed in with a precise account. First documented stateside in the 1941 printing of Crosby Gaige’s “Cocktail Guide and Ladies’ Companion,” It’s a recipe likely to have triggered and inspired the founders of Tiki culture, Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic, the latter of which also included it in his 1947 “Bartender’s Guide by Trader Vic.” It appears to be one of the first well known dark rum cocktails to incorporate Falernum, a wondrous alternative to simple syrup with punchy spice character and a mainstay ingredient for any professional bartender who enjoys mixing rum cocktails. Falernum originates from Barbados as a sweet rum based liqueur with spices like clove, ginger, almonds as well as lime zest. The Royal Yacht Club cocktail is a bare bones template of a Tiki cocktail with dark rum as well as a Bermuda cocktail without Bermuda rum. Bermuda, unlike Barbados and other outlying Caribbean regions did not have the same full on plantation culture as some of the more well known rum regions. The story of the RBYC cocktail is about sailing, prestige, trendy Daiquiri cocktail culture, spice and capturing a community in a moment of time. It cannot be greatly altered without thereby becoming something different. Key in its signature character: Falernum. One cannot make a RBYC cocktail without it.

What is the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club?

The Royal Bermuda Yacht Club is more than just a cocktail, more than just another riff on the Classic Daiquiri and more than just an actual historic British Yacht Club founded on November 1st, 1844 in Bermuda. Originally led by a gathering of 30 British Army officers and local Bermudian sailors, they adopted the term “Royal” when in 1845, Prince Albert accepted the invitation to become Patron of the Club and the name was adjusted officially in 1846. Still going today, the RBYC hosts regattas and funds scholarships towards sailing education. It’s also one of the three oldest clubs with a Royal Warrant outside of the British isles.

Royal Bermuda Yacht Club dark rum cocktail Variations and types

This is the heritage recipe for any Rum sour and all Tiki/Tropical rum cocktails PERIOD. We recommend one using aged rum like the Dos Maderas 5+3 or 5+5
This is another variant of the Daiquiri made with dark Jamaican Rum, honey syrup and bitters. Consider it a cocktail cousin with a bit more haut gout funk and earthiness.

FAQ

Cointreau is the best go-to classic orange liqueur to use in the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club cocktail. Subbing in Pierre Ferrand’s Dry Curaçao will adjust the balance to become a bit brighter but also drier while subbing in Grand Marnier will add more weight, sweetness and texture.

Exact dates or origin are murky but the first mention of the cocktail comes in 1941 in Crosby Gaige’s “Cocktail Guide and Ladies’ Companion”. Gaige was a New York theatre producer as well as patron and practitioner of the culinary and cocktail arts. It’s possible he may have created the recipe but it’s also likely he may have simply added it to his collection for publication.

Speculation feeds the art of heresy and it is no different in cocktail culture. Clearly a riff on a Classic Daiquiri, it may have made its way up to New York in 1941 but the true creator is a bit lost to dark bar rooms and island lore. The inclusion of Falernum indicates that it may have Bajan origins but there’s not a whole lot else to go on.

Cocktails with Dos Maderas 5+3

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